In your field of work, customers may have a tendency to do a lot of research before even needing your services or seeking you out- but you want to be there to help them through this research and education process. Whether you want to show you care through educating on prevention processes or how to cope once the problem has set in- Native Advertising gives you the chance to share great and engaging information with readers on the ISJ website, your website and social media pages. These articles feature great content that people are even more likely to read than some news articles- all sponsored by you. With your ads surrounding each article, you have the chance to show off your great staff and experts in the article’s subject- so readers know who to contact if they want more information… and it shows you want to help even before your services are needed and makes you the expert.

Read more about Native Advertising below and feel free to contact us for more information.

What is Native Advertising?

Sharethough.com defines Native Advertising as:

"A form of paid media where the ad experience follows the natural form and function of the user experience in which it is placed."

To put it simply, native ads are articles or content that visually match the design of the platform they are in- the look and feel like "natural content."

Facebook is a major publisher of native advertising and serves as a great example for explaining just what this emerging from of advertising looks like. Take a loot at your Facebook newsfeed, you will probably see a post labeled "Suggested Post," that has the same look and feel of posts your friends and family have added and shared- this is likely an example of native advertising." 

Examples of Native Advertising

In this example of Native Advertising on idahostatejournal.com, Ashley Home Store has sponsored the article "6 secrets for buying quality furniture on a budget." This article features valuable and interesting information for readers provided by a relevant sponsor.

Ashley Home Store's ads also appear above and to the side of the article.

Examples of Native Advertising

In addition to having a sponsored article page featuring the sponsor's ads, logos and articles, each native article is placed in the news feed on the homepage of the web site for five days.

Here you can see how the sponsored content functions like the natural content of the web page. 

Frequently asked questions

Who writes the article?
We partner with a content studio that employs highly qualified writers. Once the article idea is submitted a strategist matches it with a writer with knowledge on that subject.

Who comes up with the article ideas?
The article sponsor is encouraged to come up with the article theme. A local greenhouse may want to sponsor an article about what plants will grow best in our area, for example. Remember, the article should not read like an ad.

Can I contribute to the article?
Yes. We can arrange for the writer of the article to call you for an interview.

Can I review the ad before it is published?
Yes. The article is sent to the sponsor for review. Changes or revisions can be made.

Can I submit my own photos?
Yes. We can also provide stock photos for the article.

What is the turnaround time?
Once the article idea is proposed it will be ready for review within eight (8) business days.

Native Advertising in the Monthly Marketer

Written By: Kelsey West
For the: Southeast Idaho Business Journal

Native Advertising. Have you heard of it? Perhaps not the term, but my guess is that you have probably seen it before and on many different platforms. Native Advertising is becoming a popular form of increasing brand awareness and brand trust for many businesses. According to the Online Publishers Association, “81 percent of marketers are looking to increase audience engagement and promote brand visibility through native ads.”

So what is native advertising? Sharethrough defines native advertising as a “form of paid media where the ad experience follows the natural form and function of the user experience in which it is placed.” To put it simply, native ads are articles or content that visually match the design of the platform they are in- they look and feel like “natural content.” Facebook is a major publisher of native advertising and serves as a great example for explaining just what this emerging form of advertising looks like. Take a look at your Facebook newsfeed, you will probably see a post labeled “Suggested Post,” that has the same look and feel of posts your friends and family have added and shared- this is likely an example of native advertising.

Not only do these “suggested posts” look like they are apart of your newsfeed rather than an ad- they have specific types of content. Rather than directly promoting or advertising a product, they are providing the consumer with valuable information relevant to that product and sponsored by a specific brand. For example, The New York Times featured a “paid post” in August of 2014 titled, “Women Inmates: Why the Male Model Doesn’t Work.” The article was about the increasing number of female inmates, the effects on their families and prison reform. This particular “paid post” was sponsored by Netflix’s “Orange is the New Black,” a series based on female inmates facing these types of issues. Although this article did not directly talk about the Netflix series, it did cover an interesting topic relevant to the show.

Another example a little closer to home is from KSL.com based out of Salt Lake City, Utah. In this “sponsored post” KSL features an article on their home page that looks just like any other news article but is labeled “Sponsored.” This particular article is titled “August 2015: 15 incredible user photos” sponsored by Utah.com’s campaign “This is Utah, You’re Welcome” a campaign aimed at promoting Utah’s national parks. In the article, KSL featured 15 photos submitted by professional and amateur photographers all featuring lovely depictions from Utah’s national parks. Although this article doesn’t directly promote the national parks and this particular campaign- it shows a series of intriguing photos meant to entertain viewers while at the same time spark interest about the digital display ads surrounding the article which all advertise the Utah.com national parks campaign.

So, why is this new form of advertising popping up in so many marketers’ budgets? Well, not only are they able to advertise their brand with traditional online display ads surrounding their content- they are also sharing valuable information, content or entertainment with potential customers. And, because that information is valuable or entertaining, consumers tend to spend a lot more time with it. Sharethrough and IPG found that consumers engaged with native ads 53 percent more frequently than traditional display ads and 32 percent of surveyed consumers also said they would actually share a native ad with someone they know. For advertisers this is huge. Not only are consumers more likely to engage in the ads and the brand- they are likely to share that ad with others expanding the advertiser’s reach even further. Being sharable content means this form of advertising is not limited to one platform either. Although the article or video may be hosted on the New York Times, KSL or even the Idaho State Journal’s websites- it can be shared and used across social media, email and posted to other sites for more eyes to see and engage in. Engagement is another major benefit to native ads, as consumers will actually look at native ads and original editorial content for similar amounts of time as they read through the sponsored article or watch the sponsored video. And, once combined with sponsored content, display ads have a three times greater click through rate than regular run of site ads. So, by adding native advertising to their marketing arsenal, advertisers are able to really spark the attention of their potential customers by getting them engaged in their ads and providing them with valuable content that can actually help build trust in the company.